Global Entry Follow-Up

We’ve been using Global Entry for a couple of years and I wanted to share how it works at various ports of entry.

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Dublin

When we departed from Dublin, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) did the U.S. entry processing in Dublin.

First we checked our bags with the airline. Then we went to the Global Entry kiosks. We placed our passport on the reader, smiled for the camera, put our hand on the sensor and answered a few questions. They showed us pictures of our bags and we had to acknowledge that they were ours. We took the receipt that the kiosk printed and headed for the exit. We waved the receipt politely to the Immigration agents and kept going. We didn’t see a Customs agent. Then we went to Starbucks and waited on the rest of our party.

Chicago

When we returned from Quebec through Chicago, the CBP did the U.S. entry processing in Chicago. On the flight into Chicago, when the flight attendant passed out Form 6059B we didn’t have to complete it. Then when we deplaned and went to the Immigration area (huge and packed), we went to the Global Entry kiosks. They were marked with bright yellow signs at the far end of the hall. Again we placed our passport on the reader, smiled for the camera, put our hand on the sensor and answered a few questions. The kiosk printed a receipt. We waved the receipt politely to the Immigration agents and kept going to baggage claim. We took our bags and found the Global Entry Customs agent. He was the one without a line. He waved us through and we were done in 5 minutes.

Nassau

Then there was Nassau. Somewhat similar to Dublin, the CBP did the U.S. entry processing in Nassau. First we checked our bags with the airline. Then we went to the Global Entry kiosks. We placed our passport on the reader, smiled for the camera, put our hand on the sensor and answered a few questions. The kiosk printed a receipt. But then we had to queue up for an CBP agent. They asked for our passports and the receipts from the kiosk. The agent showed us pictures of our bags and we had to acknowledge that they were ours. They asked us a lot of the same questions that we had answered on the kiosk. I couldn’t really tell much of a difference in processing us as Global Entry travelers from non-Global Entry travelers.

Campobello Island

We used the Global Entry Cards for our land entry and exit to and from Canada at Campobello Island. They worked just like a passport.

In summary, I still feel that Global Entry is worthwhile even for a casual international traveler. Obviously (and surprisingly) the benefit and process varies significantly by location.

Originally published at blog.benmoore.info on April 1, 2019.

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IT professional, Formula 1 fan

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