This is the first in a series of posts about Application Layer Gateways. But first you have to understand Network Address Translation (NAT).

NAT is what makes your router such a good firewall.

Basically it makes all of your Internet requests look as if they originated from the router, hiding your various devices. But more than that, it only allows incoming packets that are responsive to outgoing packets.

Here’s how wikipedia explains it:

[T]he port numbers are changed so that the combination of IP address (within the IP header) and port number (within the Transport Layer header) on the returned…


I follow KnowBe4’s blog. Recently they covered a white paper by Cybersecurity Insiders.

It raised several issues that I’ve been worried about since the pandemic hit and everybody went home.

KnowBe4 called out the following key findings:

  • Almost three-quarters of organizations are concerned about the security risks introduced by users working from home; despite these challenges, 86% are likely to continue supporting remote work in the future.
  • Key security challenges cited include user awareness and training (57%), home/public WiFi network security (52%), and sensitive data leaving the perimeter (46%).
  • The applications that organizations are most concerned with securing include, file…

Several years ago, I stumbled across Google’s Internet speed test. That prompted me to look at several other Internet speed testing tools. The post is here.

This article on CNET prompted me to look again. CNET had a couple of tools I hadn’t heard of before so I ran them against my previous set of tools.

At my house I have a 200Mbps Xfinity connection. I was using my ThinkPad X390 with an Intel(R) Wireless-AC 9560 160MHz Wi-Fi adapter. Intel says that adapter can deliver 1.73Gbps so that probably wasn’t a limiting factor.

Test _____ Download *Ookla _____ 196Mbps *fast.com


My previous post covered how to restore Windows Photo Viewer. While that worked, I kinda got frustrated that I kept having to do that.

I fell back to my trusty Google search and came up with some alternatives to Windows Photo Viewer.

The article that seemed most on point to me was on Skylum.

#4 on their list was FastStone Image Viewer but it was #1 for me.

I always like portable applications and FastStone has one for their Image Viewer.

I put the portable version in my OneDrive/Software folder so it’s available on all my PCs.

Oh, it’s free.

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


I’ve been accused of being a Luddite and maybe I am.

But maybe I just like simple applications that just work.

Windows 7 and 8 had a really nice application, Windows Photo Viewer. It had useful and intuitive keyboard and cursor commands.

Windows 10 displaced (not REplaced) Windows Photo Viewer with Photos. To me, it’s not as intuitive as Windows Photo Viewer.

The good news is that Windows Photo Viewer is still there. And if you got to Windows 10 by an upgrade in place from Windows 7 or 8, getting Windows Photo Viewer back is easy.

CNET has a…


So I’m a year into using an iPhone X coming from an Essential PH-1. I’ve posted several times about my experiences — 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

I still have a few items to close the loop on.

Battery Life — My iPhone’s battery life is really incredible. I tend to check the battery at 10PM. Most days the % of battery remaining is around 60%. If I’ve taken a lot of video or listened to a lot of podcasts, it will dip down into the 50% range. I checked the battery capacity recently and it is still 86%.

Face…


10+ years ago, I put a QR code on the back of my business card. Let’s just say I was ahead of the times.

Then Apple included QR code recognition into their iPhone camera app.

And then the COVID pandemic caused QR codes to pop up in restaurants with links to “touch free” menus.

QR codes can contain a variety of information. You can create your own here.

But for URLs, it’s even easier than that.

Google has included a QR code generator in the latest versions of Chrome. I just noticed the new icon in Chrome’s address bar.


Google’s Chrome 80 introduced a new deep linking feature called “Scroll to Text Fragment.” That description struggles to describe what it does.

Basically, it lets you specify a link that will position a web page at a string that you choose.

Here’s a screen shot that doesn’t use it.

Here’s a screen shot that scrolls to “Beat”.

Notice that the requested string is highlighted.

Now for the bad news. It’s really hard to use.

Here’s the URL that I used in the above example.

https://techcrunch.com/2020/03/20/psa-yes-you-can-join-a-zoom-meeting-in-the-browser/#:~:text=Beat

And I can’t find a tool that lets you easily construct that URL. I use Notepad.

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


A year ago, I posted on “ What is 5G.” I started it with “It depends.”

It still does, depend.

But a lot has happened in the last year.

Android Central’s podcast is one of my favorites. Their Episode 510 features Sascha Segan deep diving into the current state of 5G worldwide. Just listen to the first 30 minutes or so.

Here are a few excerpts:

… 5G can use bigger wider radio channels than 4G can. And if we look at the countries that have the best 5G performance, it’s generally places where their governments have allocated the appropriate…


Last year I posted on how to create a link to scroll directly to a text fragment using Chrome.

At that time, there wasn’t a tool to help with this. I noted that I did it with Notepad.

Thankfully, that has changed. Now there’s a Chrome extension from Google that will do that for you.

With that extension installed, all you have to do is highlight the desired text and right click on it.

Ben Moore

IT professional, Formula 1 fan

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