I’ll start by conceding that the problem I’ll be discussing was MINE, not Xfinity’s.

But we didn’t know that for a long time.

Recently my 2 year contract with Xfinity lapsed and my bill jumped $50 per month. I called to renegotiate.

They responded with a new plan that had the same TV channels and bumped the Internet speed from 200Mbps to 800Mbps. While I didn’t NEED that speed increase, faster is always better.

So after a couple of days, I tried a speedtest.

Hmmm. 250Mbps. What’s up with that?

So I looked at my modem, a CISCO DPC3008. While…


I post fairly regularly about the “cloud.” I have mixed opinions depending on the size and capability of your organization.

But recently I was following a story of Google changing their desktop Drive solution, AGAIN.

As frustrating as that will be to Google Drive users, that’s not the story I want to tell.

Often the comments on a tech story are as interesting and valuable as the story itself and this was no exception.

It’s just another reminder that The Cloud is just someone else’s computer. And if they decide to change the rules around using their computer, then you either have to suck it up and accept it, or to try and pull back in all your data yourself. Neither of which is usually an easy or pleasant experience…

Turns out, there’s even a t-shirt for this!

Get yours now!

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


My router ( Asus RT-AC68R) has a nice traffic monitor screen. I check it regularly. One day I noticed that an iPhone had a large amount of traffic attributed to STUN.

Off I went to figure out what STUN was.

It turns out that STUN stands for Session Traversal Utilities for NAT. Interestingly, STUN messages are sent in the lower overhead User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets, not Transmission Control Protocol (TCP).

Still, what on the iPhone was using STUN?

Facetime.

Here’s Apple’s chart of port usage that calls out STUN.

Check off that we’ve learned something today.

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


One iOS feature that I really like is AirDrop. A recent article (archive.is) in Winaero explained a similar Windows 10 feature called Nearby Share.

Nearby Share in Windows 10 allows transferring files between files within the same network. It is a great and somewhat underrated feature that will let you ditch third-party sharing apps and slow USB thumb drives. Being integrated into the OS, Nearby Share ensures the best compatibility with almost any Windows 10 device.

I would add that it is pretty much unknown, even by a geek like me.

You need relatively recent version of Windows 10, e.g…


In Part II, I discussed how certain applications are allowed to “tweak” the router so that traffic to different incoming ports is allowed.

This post is the final part of this discussion (at least for now).

Again, I will reference Steve Gibson’s Security Now podcast, this time episode 804.

In this episode, Steve describes how a NAT slipstreaming attack allows a remote attacker to trick the NAT into creating NAT traversal mappings to ANY device on the internal network,

This isn’t good.

Armis discovered that routers’ Application Layer Gateways (ALGs) have even more issues.

WebRTC TURN (Traversal Using Relay around…


I wrote about how I had forced the upgrade to Windows 10 21H1 in a previous post. I did it the hard way and suffered the consequences. That post described the cleanup I had to do.

Well, I came across another laptop that hadn’t/wouldn’t upgrade to 21H1. I didn’t want to take the hard way again.

If a PC automatically offers 21H1, the installation is QUICK. So I set out to find how to force that laptop to upgrade in the same manner as if it were automatically offered.

And I found it.

It seems that 21H1’s functions were actually…


June 8, 2021 was the 40th anniversary of the Intel 8086 microprocessor chip. Today it’s usually called the x86 chip.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ic-photo-Intel--D8086--%288086-CPU%29.png

I worked in IT during those 40 years and have a few thoughts.

In the 1990s, there were several competing architectures in the enterprise realm. I especially recall DEC’s Alpha and Sun’s SPARC. The less said about IBM’s PowerPC the better. It took me some Googling to even remember what HP’s processor was. And nobody remembers Intel’s Itanium. HP went all in on Itanium and look where that got them.

But these architectures locked an organization into a specific vendor…


This article came up in my feed recently:

Microsoft Exchange admin portal blocked by expired SSL certificate (archive.is)

This noted that the Microsoft Exchange admin portal was down after Microsoft forgot to renew the SSL certificate for the website.

That sounded familiar to me so I went back and searched my blog.

Bingo!

In that case Microsoft tweeted:

It’s déjà vu all over again.

Apparently Microsoft didn’t take my advice:

Maybe they should have put a reminder on their Outlook calendar.

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


I know I’m not your normal user. I try things so you don’t have to.

Recently I forced the installation of Windows 10 21H1 on my ThinkPad. To do this, I downloaded the Windows Update Assistant and ran it.

Don’t try this at home.

Unlike the upgrade from the Windows Update app, this process does a FULL Windows 10 update.

But it all went well. It took a long time unlike using the Windows Update app but worked fine.

Then a week later, I was poking around in my C: drive. (You do this, don’t you?)

I found several folders…

Ben Moore

IT professional, Formula 1 fan

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store