KnowBe4 has an interesting back story. They have an excellent Enterprise Security Awareness Training program that my organization highly recommends.

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I follow their blog.

A recent article was a real eye opener. It described how bad actors can spoof phising links by using hover texts.

In summary, HTML has the capability to display pop-up text when the cursor hovers over a link. The bad actors use this capability to distract the user from looking at the real link which appears in the lower left corner of the browser window.

My recommendation — with your cursor hovering over the link, right click and choose “Copy link address”.

Then open Notepad and paste the link. That way you can see where the link will REALLY take you.

If the link is confusing, paste the link into the URL Decoder/Encoder and click “Decode”.

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


I guess I got your attention with that post title.

I was very happy with Pulse when I was using an Android phone.

But everyone knows that iMessage doesn’t work on Windows.

When I was looking for a high-speed way to backup photos from an iOS device, I came across this article:

[How to] Get iMessage to Work on Windows PC using Dell Mobile Connect on a non dell PC (archive.org)

I figured it was click bait. There’s no telling how many of those rabbits I’ve chased.

But not this one.

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Here’s Dell’s page on Dell Mobile Connect (archive.org).

Now, don’t think that this is as capable as Pulse. For example, with messaging you can only see messages that have taken place while the PC was connected to the iPhone. History isn’t presented. For pictures, when you download them, the files are written into an obscure location that took me ages to find. Then the filenames are some random (to me) string. …


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And they left some stuff out, e.g. “file:” checking.


I’m really a reluctant iPhone user. But there are so many things I like about the iPhone, particularly the hardware.

Anyway, one of the challenges I have between any smartphone and my Windows laptop is how to move small content back and forth.

For example, it is so much easier to compose text messages on my laptop keyboard than on a touch keyboard. And to take an image from either side to the other is especially difficult with iOS.

What I’ve found is that one of my favorite cross-platform productivity tools is perfect for this — Google Keep.

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Keep is a very flexible container for content and works equally well on Windows, Android, and iOS. …


Here we go again.

Recently, the press was filled with headlines about Microsoft removing driver updates from the Windows Device Manager.

Microsoft has removed a useful driver updating feature from Windows 10

So, when is the last time YOU went to the Device Manager and searched for a driver?

Did Microsoft really do this? Yes. Does it matter? Not really. Did they actually make an improvement? Probably.

What they did is they moved the driver updates to the Windows Update process that most everybody uses.

Here’s a comment from one of the above articles:

The new method via Windows Update seems to work great though, but you can’t search specifically for that device/part. But i guess if nothing shows up, it means you’re already up to date.


I still wrestle with how to backup photos from my iOS devices. In a recent post, I discussed how I use OneDrive for daily backup.

But sometimes you want to backup photos en masse.

The best thing I’ve found is Remote File Manager from Jane Zhang.

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While Remote File Manager is not for the novice, it is an extraordinarily capable app.

I use it to copy photos from my iOS devices to my NAS storage, e.g. Drobo.

Click on the +.

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And chose to create a new network connection.

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Notice you can also specify various cloud services.

Select the NAS device.

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Navigate to the destination folder you want.

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Click on “Edit” then “Upload”.

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Pick the Photo Library on the iOS device and then the album you want.

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Select the pictures you want and then click on “Save”.

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Sit back and watch.

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


We all know how valuable the copy-paste capability is. Even the iPhone added copy-paste in iOS 4.

On Windows, select an object, press CTRL+C, navigate to a new location, press CTRL+V and there it is!

Oh, you need to paste something you copied earlier? Tough. Go back and find it again (if it still exists), and CTRL+C it again.

Until now.

Recent updates to Windows 10 have added a built-in clipboard history.

Go to Windows 10’s Settings > System > Clipboard to enable clipboard history.

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Then when you want to paste next time, press Windows Key+V.

Here’s what you’ll see.

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Enjoy!

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


This pandemic has popularized a new acronym — WFH — Work From Home.

That scares me. I worry that WFH security is not what is should be.

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IBM published a Work From Home Study. Here are their Key Points:

  1. 93% of those newly working from home are confident in their company’s ability to keep personal identifiable information (PII) secure while working remotely, yet 52% are using their personal laptops for work — often with no new tools to secure it, and 45% haven’t received any new training.
  2. More than half have yet to be given any new security policies on how to securely work from home, leaving 47% concerned about impending cybersecurity…

So you think that the ransom payment is the biggest cost of a ransomware attack?

Not even close.

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A recent article by Decrypt covers the costs of ransomware.

Cybersecurity company Emsisoft estimated that total ransom payments that were demanded in 2019 was $25 billion.

That’s bad enough. But Emsisoft estimated that the total cost was as much as seven times this, as much as $170 billion.

Most of the difference results from downtime and from dealing with the attack.

Coveware reports that it takes victims of a ransomware attack 16 days to restore their network. Think about your network being down 16 days.

Gartner suggests that the average cost per minute is $5,600. Tick-tock.

That’s why 1 out of 3 companies just pay the ransom.

Don’t be in that group.

Worry. React. Invest.

Originally published at https://blog.benmoore.info.


From time to time, I run across Windows tools. I’m NOT recommending any of these but just giving you a place to start looking.

O&O AppBuster

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O&O AppBuster shows you which of these Microsoft-supplied apps with Windows 10 are installed on your computer and which you can install on request — even hidden apps are displayed here.

Remote Utilities

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You can view screens remotely, send keystrokes, control the mouse pointer, transfer files and do any other operation just as if you were physically sitting in front of the remote PC.

Win10 All Settings

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The main aim of the application is to help users customize Windows 10 in all circumstances with alternative configuration interfaces, and it can also perform some hidden settings.

About

Ben Moore

IT professional, Formula 1 fan

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